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A good book can be life-changing. Here are 4 must-read books on mental health we recommend. Don’t Feed The Monkey Mind By Jennifer Shannon, LMFT Are you giving up your long-term interests or compromising your personal values in exchange for short-term anxiety relief? This straightforward and well written guide by psychotherapist Jennifer Shannon provides a cognitive behavioral therapy-based approach to managing anxiety and anxious thoughts. In addition to mindfulness and ACT, (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy) the author provides simple, effective techniques that are easy to learn and implement. Mindfulness For Anger Management By Dr. Stephen Dansiger Mindfulness for Anger Management: ...
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Some days, coping with depression just means making it through another day. You’ve managed to climb out of bed, maybe even put on some pants, but the prospect of another 24 hours seems daunting. What can you do right now to change your mood? Here are a few simple and easy-to-implement techniques to cope with depression right now. Laugh “It is impossible for you to be angry and laugh at the same time. Anger and laughter are mutually exclusive and you have the power to choose either.” -Wayne Dyer Laughter releases endorphins which decrease stress hormones and improve your resistance ...
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To maximize the value and impact of marriage counseling, it requires a serious effort and commitment from both partners. Despite being at odds or in disagreement on something, they must always consider themselves a team, the counselor as the coach, and divorce as the opposing team. If you aren’t in it to win it, what are you playing for? Here are a few tips on how to get the most out of marriage counseling. 1. Set Clear Goals For Yourself Before your first session, take some time to think about what you really want out of marriage counseling. Is there ...
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Managing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, can be a challenge. It requires patience, practice, and self-discipline. It also requires a personalized strategy designed to create change. This is where cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help. Cognitive behavioral therapy is a form of psychotherapy that challenges negative patterns of thought in order to remove unwanted behavior problems or treat mood disorders. By being more aware of these patterns, and working to change them, the patient is able to think more clearly and respond in a more effective manner. According to a 2018 study, researchers found cognitive behavioral therapy could reduce ...
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Every family faces a unique set of challenges. For some, it’s a lack of communication. For others, it’s a family member with a substance abuse disorder. Family therapy can help resolve these problems in your relationships, whether they are between a partner, children, or other family members. It creates a safe, controlled space for everyone to discuss their thoughts and feelings without fear of repercussion or ridicule. How do you know when it’s time for family therapy? If one or more of the following symptoms sound familiar, it’s time to speak with a professional. Changes In Behavior - Has your ...
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Play therapy is used to help children express themselves, explore their feelings, and discover new ideas that lead to healthier, happier outcomes. It can be used as a primary intervention or adjunctive therapy for many social, emotional, and behavioral disorders. And while play therapy is most appropriate for children three to twelve years old, teens and adults can also benefit from these techniques. Here are just a few developmental benefits of play therapy. Build Social Skills Social skills are critical to healthy child development. Social skills teach children how to communicate their needs, learn cooperation, to be assertive, and make ...
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In 2019, suicide was the second leading cause of death for teens. Suicide rates for adolescent girls has doubled since 2007, as have suicide attempts. The first step to improving mental health and reducing teenage suicide is by having informed, rational public and private discussions about it within the community. This starts with a conversation between you and your teen. Here are 4 tips for talking to your teen about suicide. Prepare Conversations about suicide, depression, and self-harm can be difficult to have with a loved one, especially a child. Commit to staying calm, compassionate, and better understanding their pain. ...
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Obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors that interfere with living a healthy life are symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder. For example, an irrational fear of germs may cause someone to avoid touching doorknobs, or social interactions. Or, an excessive need for order results in continuous cleaning and rearranging. For some, OCD can even cause brief repetitive tics such as blinking, grunting, sniffling, or jerking their head. While it is common to experience both the thoughts and behavior symptoms of OCD together, they can be experienced separately. Here are some of the most common symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder: Symptoms Of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) ...
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It can be difficult to get motivated when you suffer from depression. You may feel defeated, hopeless, or exhausted. However, one step in the right direction can create the momentum that leads to total transformation. Here are four ways to better manage depression with a healthier daily routine. Set An Alarm An irregular sleep pattern can increase your risk of depression almost as much as someone who is sleep deprived. Plan for a rewarding day by preparing for it the night before. Experts advise 7-9 hours of sleep for adults. Furthermore, studies have shown people who wake up earlier were ...
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The American Psychological Association defines trauma as “an emotional response to an extremely negative event.” Traumatic stress reactions are normal responses to abnormal circumstances. They can be caused from one-time events, ongoing stress, or something that happened during childhood. Here are 4 ways untreated trauma can impact our lives. Emotionally Common feelings experienced after a traumatic event can include anger, shame, fear, and sadness. It is not uncommon to feel a heightened level of anxiety, or overwhelming stress during this time. Some even report feelings of excessive or inappropriate guilt. Many will describe feeling numb, or detached. This is a ...
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